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dc.contributor.authorSalayo, Nerissa D.
dc.contributor.authorGarces, Len
dc.contributor.authorPido, Michael
dc.contributor.authorViswanathan, Kuperan
dc.contributor.authorPomeroy, Robert
dc.contributor.authorAhmed, Mahfuzuddin
dc.contributor.authorSiason, Ida
dc.contributor.authorSeng, Keang
dc.contributor.authorMasae, Awae
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-01T08:10:54Z
dc.date.available2011-06-01T08:10:54Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationSalayo, N., Garces, L., Pido, M., Viswanathan, K., Pomeroy, R., Ahmed, M., … Masae, A. (2008). Managing excess capacity in small-scale fisheries: Perspectives from stakeholders in three Southeast Asian countries. Marine Policy, 32(4), 692-700.en
dc.identifier.issn0308-597X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10862/92
dc.descriptionSEAFDEC main author, ISI-CC covered journal, non-SEAFDEC study.en
dc.description.abstractThe management of fishing capacity--in both inland and marine fisheries--is a major policy concern in most countries in Southeast Asia. Excess capacity leads to a number of negative impacts, such as resource use conflicts, overfishing, environmental degradation, economic wastage, and security threats. This paper presents the results of a regional study that examined various approaches to managing excess fishing capacity in small-scale fisheries in Southeast Asia. More specifically, the paper presents an analysis of perceptions of stakeholders in Cambodia, Philippines and Thailand regarding preferred solutions to addressing excess capacity. The paper concludes with a discussion of policy guidance for addressing excess fishing capacity based on the stakeholder-preferred solutions.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe management of fishing capacity—in both inland and marine fisheries—is a major policy concern in most countries in Southeast Asia. Excess capacity leads to a number of negative impacts, such as resource use conflicts, overfishing, environmental degradation, economic wastage, and security threats. This paper presents the results of a regional study that examined various approaches to managing excess fishing capacity in small-scale fisheries in Southeast Asia. More specifically, the paper presents an analysis of perceptions of stakeholders in Cambodia, Philippines and Thailand regarding preferred solutions to addressing excess capacity. The paper concludes with a discussion of policy guidance for addressing excess fishing capacity based on the stakeholder-preferred solutions.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.subjectCambodiaen
dc.subjectPhilippinesen
dc.subjectSouth East Asiaen
dc.subjectThailanden
dc.subjectExcess fishing capacityen
dc.titleManaging excess capacity in small-scale fisheries: Perspectives from stakeholders in three Southeast Asian countriesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.citation.volume32
dc.citation.issue4
dc.citation.spage692
dc.citation.epage700
dc.citation.journalTitleMarine Policyen
dc.subject.asfaDisputesen
dc.subject.asfaFishery managementen
dc.subject.asfaFishery policyen
dc.subject.asfaMarine fisheriesen
dc.subject.asfaOcean policyen
dc.subject.asfaOverfishingen
dc.subject.asfaArtisanal fishingen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.marpol.2007.12.001


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  • AQD [1128]
    These papers were contributed by AQD staff to various national and international journals

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