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dc.contributor.authorGarcia, Luis Maria B.
dc.contributor.authorHilomen-Garcia, Grace V.
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-23T08:45:54Z
dc.date.available2014-05-23T08:45:54Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationGarcia, L. M. B., & Hilomen-Garcia, G. V. (2009). Grow-out of juvenile seahorse Hippocampus kuda (Bleeker; Teleostei: Syngnathidae) in illuminated sea cages. Aquaculture Research, 40(2), 211-217.en
dc.identifier.issn1355-557X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10862/2090
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the feasibility of rearing 10–15-day- and 0.7–1.5-month-old seahorse Hippocampus kuda in illuminated sea cages to continue existing hatchery protocols to mass produce H. kuda for trade and enhance depleted wild stocks in their natural habitats. Thawed Acetes (a planktonic crustacean abundant in inshore seas) was fed to juvenile seahorses in lighted and unlighted sea cages while one group in lighted cages was not fed Acetes. After 10–12 weeks of rearing, both mean body weight and stretch height increased in all treatment groups, with lighted cage-reared seahorses fed Acetes being heavier (2 g) and longer (8 cm) than the other two treatment groups. Although instantaneous growth rates declined during the rearing period, these were generally higher among Acetes-fed seahorses in lighted cages (0.02–0.07) compared with those in the unlighted cages with Acetes and lighted cages without Acetes feeding. Mean survivorship in all groups ranged from 9% to 74% after the trials, but mean survivorship of juveniles in lighted cages with Acetes feeding (9–74%) was consistently lower than the two treatment groups as a likely result of crustacean and piscine predators being attracted by light and the odour of leftover Acetes in the lighted cages. These results demonstrate that light-attracted zooplankton prey supplemented by Acetes feeding may provide essential nutrients for the growth of H. kuda juveniles in illuminated sea cages. With further improvement in the grow-out protocol, it may provide a possible alternative livelihood to seahorse fishers and sufficient seed to re-populate depleted wild stocks of H. kuda.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors thank Ms. Fritizie Celino, Messrs. Ronald Maliao and Tomas Gonzales and the staff of IMS for their assistance. This research was funded by the SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department under Study Code Number Nr-04-F99T and, in part, by the Natural Sciences Research Institute of the University of the Philippines.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishingen
dc.subjectAcetes
dc.subjectHippocampus kuda
dc.subjectSyngnathidae
dc.subjectTeleostei
dc.titleGrow-out of juvenile seahorse Hippocampus kuda (Bleeker; Teleostei: Syngnathidae) in illuminated sea cagesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.citation.volume40
dc.citation.issue2
dc.citation.spage211
dc.citation.epage217
dc.citation.journalTitleAquaculture Researchen
dc.subject.asfaAttracting techniquesen
dc.subject.asfaBody weighten
dc.subject.asfaCage cultureen
dc.subject.asfaFeedingen
dc.subject.asfaFood organismsen
dc.subject.asfaGrowth rateen
dc.subject.asfaHabitaten
dc.subject.asfaHatcheriesen
dc.subject.asfaJuvenilesen
dc.subject.asfaLight effectsen
dc.subject.asfaMarine fishen
dc.subject.asfaNutrientsen
dc.subject.asfaOdouren
dc.subject.asfaPredatorsen
dc.subject.asfaPredationen
dc.subject.asfaSeed (aquaculture)en
dc.subject.asfaSeedsen
dc.subject.asfaSurvivalen
dc.subject.asfaZooplanktonen
dc.identifier.essn1365-2109
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2109.2008.02084.x


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  • AQD [1100]
    These papers were contributed by AQD staff to various national and international journals

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