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dc.contributor.authorParkes, Lee
dc.contributor.authorQuinitio, Emilia T.
dc.contributor.authorLe Vay, Lewis
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-23T02:52:59Z
dc.date.available2014-06-23T02:52:59Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationParkes, L., Quinitio, E. T., & Le Vay, L. (2011). Phenotypic differences between hatchery-reared and wild mud crabs, Scylla Serrata, and the effects of conditioning. Aquaculture International, 19(2), 361-380.en
dc.identifier.issn0967-6120
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10862/2117
dc.description.abstractHatchery-reared animals for stock enhancement should be competent to survive and grow at rates equivalent to those of wild conspecifics. However, morphological differences are often observed, and pre-conditioning steps may be required to improve the fitness of hatchery-reared juveniles prior to release. In the present study, hatchery-reared Scylla serrata juveniles were reared either individually (HR-solitary) or groups in tanks (HR-communal), the latter group being exposed to intraspecific competition and foraging for food. After 21 days, both groups were compared to similar size wild-caught juveniles in terms of morphometric measurements of carapace spination, abnormalities and carapace colouration. There were some limited significant differences between HR-communal crabs and HR-solitary crabs in terms of length of 8th and 9th lateral spines and in body-weight-carapace width ratio, but both treatments differed from wild crabs, which were heavier and had longer carapace spines for thei
dc.description.abstractHatchery-reared animals for stock enhancement should be competent to survive and grow at rates equivalent to those of wild conspecifics. However, morphological differences are often observed, and pre-conditioning steps may be required to improve the fitness of hatchery-reared juveniles prior to release. In the present study, hatchery-reared Scylla serrata juveniles were reared either individually (HR-solitary) or groups in tanks (HR-communal), the latter group being exposed to intraspecific competition and foraging for food. After 21 days, both groups were compared to similar size wild-caught juveniles in terms of morphometric measurements of carapace spination, abnormalities and carapace colouration. There were some limited significant differences between HR-communal crabs and HR-solitary crabs in terms of length of 8th and 9th lateral spines and in body-weight-carapace width ratio, but both treatments differed from wild crabs, which were heavier and had longer carapace spines for their size. In contrast, both HR treatments exhibited common abnormalities including deformities in the shape of the abdomen, in particular occurrence of an asymmetrical telson or a deeply folded telson. In all cases, abnormalities persisted through moulting. Initially, carapace colour differed in all measures of colour between HR and wild crabs. However, these differences reduced after a period of 4–8 days of conditioning on coloured tank backgrounds or dark sand or mud backgrounds, without moulting. Similarly, hatchery-reared crabs exhibited very limited burying behaviour on first exposure to sediment, but this increased to levels observed in wild crabs within 2–4 days. Thus, short-term conditioning of hatchery-reared crabs on dark sediments may be effective in increasing predator avoidance and survivorship in released animals, and present results suggest that this can be achieved after relatively short periods of 1 week or less.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was supported by a European Social Fund (ESF) grant to L. Parkes. The first author acknowledges the assistance of the SEAFDEC/AQD Crustacean Hatchery staff for the experimental set-up and animal husbandry and Dr. Fe Estepa for his help with the statistical analysis.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer Verlagen
dc.subjectDecapodaen
dc.subjectScylla serrataen
dc.titlePhenotypic differences between hatchery-reared and wild mud crabs, Scylla Serrata, and the effects of conditioningen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.citation.volume19
dc.citation.issue2
dc.citation.spage361
dc.citation.epage380
dc.citation.journalTitleAquaculture Internationalen
dc.subject.asfaAbnormalitiesen
dc.subject.asfaaquacultureen
dc.subject.asfaavoidance reactionsen
dc.subject.asfabottom cultureen
dc.subject.asfaburyingen
dc.subject.asfamoultingen
dc.subject.asfaphenotypesen
dc.subject.asfasurvivalen
dc.subject.asfatelsonen
dc.identifier.essn1573-143X
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10499-010-9372-1
dc.subject.scientificNameScylla serrata


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  • AQD Journal Articles [1164]
    These papers were contributed by AQD staff to various national and international journals

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